Frequently Asked Questions

How are you able to supply items containing Scottish gold when there are no working gold mines?

Our main source is gold panned from the streams of Scotland. This is a laborious process and the yields are extremely modest-some days nothing at all…However we can still supply a small number of 18 carat 100% Scottish gold items each year.

Are all your items hand made?

We confirm that all our 18 carat Scottish Gold wedding rings etc are totally hand made by a master goldsmith.

Will I receive a Certificate of Authentication that my jewellery contains Scottish gold?

We are happy to confirm that you will recieve a full certificate personally signed by the managing director of the company.

Does Scottish gold look different to other gold?

Naturally occurring Scottish gold had much the same appearance as other gold although raw gold is often associated with higher than normal silver content.

Is the jewellery made in Scotland ?

At the present time it is made in the Roman city of York where our master goldsmith works the flecks and flakes of raw Scottish gold into a workable form to make our wedding rings etc.. We don’t think it is too important where the jewellery is made as long as it contains authentic Scottish gold.

Are you a 100% ethical company?

Happily we can confirm that we are.

Are you able to deliver to all parts of the world?

Usually yes but from time to time there will be exceptions. If you are ordering from outside the UK please check with us. Unless there are unusual circumstances we do not charge for delivery

Your website refers to Scottish gold rings and bands. What’s the difference between the two terms?

In the United States of America and Canada the word ‘band’ is used whereas in the United Kingdom (which is England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland ) the word ‘ring’ is used

Can you please explain what 18 carat gold means?

Jewellery is not usually made in 24 carat gold (i.e. 100% pure gold) because pure gold would be too soft and would be subject to scratching and being damaged. To address this problem jewellers have for hundreds of years added other metals, frequently silver, to make rings and other jewellery more hard wearing.. The degree to which silver etc is added to the gold impacts upon whether a ring will be 9 carat, 14 carat, 18 carat or 22 carat. The Assay Office test each individual piece of jewellery and then mark it with according to the appropriate carat designation – this is referred to by the Assay Office as the Standard Mark. In the case of an 18 carat item it will bear the Standard Mark 750, the figure shows that the article consists of 750 parts of gold by weight to 250 parts of other metals – 75% gold. This is equal to 18 carats (18 parts in every 24), the traditional way of describing the purity of gold. However the Assay Office will still mark the item as 18 carat if the gold content is higher than 75% but not quite up to 91.6% which would take the item into the 22 carat category. These regulations are very strictly controlled.

What percentage of pure Scottish gold do your 18 carat rings contain?

Our Scottish gold is panned from streams and rivers of Scotland, consequently the composition of the gold varies as it is natural occurring. However we never use Scottish gold that is less than 18 carat. Our goldsmith smelts the small flecks and flakes (and occasionally small nuggets) of Scottish gold and in the process the ‘debris’ is removed leaving workable precious metal which is typically 90% pure Scottish gold The remaining 10% is typically silver and small amounts of other metals. The purity of the ring or other item being made is normally not over 91.6% so the Assay Office marks it as 18 carat. Whilst 18 carat usually refers to 75% purity our 18 carat Scottish gold rings typically exceed that percentage.

What are your views about phrases like a ‘touch of Scottish gold’ as used by other companies?

We feel strongly that those companies which use the phrase ‘a touch of Scottish gold’ and similar phrases should be required by law to state exactly what the Scottish gold content is.  Until the speculation is ended by an open statement of content there will always be doubt.  It is difficult to think of any product where the vendor is not required to disclose what it contains.  Recently there have been efforts to enforce disclosure but so far these has been unfruitful – see http://waleseye.com/post/90602024276/who-sells-his-freedom-in-exchange-for-gold

When you buy from Aur Cymru Limited we state exactly what the Scottish gold content is.  We would run our business no other way.

Your website refers to Scottish gold rings and bands. What’s the difference between the two terms?

In the United States of America and Canada the word ‘band’ is used whereas in the United Kingdom (which is England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland ) the word ‘ring’ is used.